Surrogacy During The Coronavirus (COVID-19) Outbreak

Surrogacy During The Coronavirus (COVID-19) Outbreak

COVID-19, the infectious disease caused by a novel coronavirus, is quickly spreading through all around the world. In fact, not long ago, the World Health Organization (WHO) declared COVID-19 a global pandemic. Some of our pregnant patients have raised concerns about Surrogacy during coronavirus outbreak. They are thoughtful about the effects that coronavirus can have on them and their babies. In this article, our team of experts will answer some of the most frequently asked questions about Surrogacy and pregnancy and Coronavirus Disease/COVID-19, using the limited scientific data available.

Pregnancy and the New Coronavirus

As you may already know, this virus is transmitted through respiratory droplets. The droplets may be released into the atmosphere whenever an infected person sneezes or coughs. It can also be spread when someone touches any surface that has been contaminated by a person with the virus.

What Can I Do to protect myself against contracting the new coronavirus?

  • The best way to mitigate the risk of getting the virus is to wash your hands frequently. Also, use soap and water to clean both sides of your hands for about 20 seconds.
  • Additionally, you should stop touching your nose, eyes, and mouth while avoiding big gatherings.
  • It is also essential to practice social distancing to reduce the spread of the new coronavirus.
  • If you are experiencing symptoms such as a mild cold or cough, stay at home and avoid contact with other people.
  • Cough and sneeze into a disposable paper tissue. If not possible, then sneeze or cough into your upper sleeve or elbow to avoid making others sick.
  • Proper hydration and adequate rest are also essential to maintain your immune health.
Fill Out An Application

As a Pregnant Woman, What are my Risks of Becoming Very Ill from the Coronavirus Disease?

Since the Coronavirus/COVID-19 is relatively new, we don’t know much about its effects on pregnant women, be it Natural Pregnancy or Surrogacy. At present, health experts believe that pregnant women have the same risk, or maybe at a higher risk. It is similar to the general public who may become severely ill if they contract COVID-19. Recent data indicates that symptoms will be mild to moderate, as with non-pregnant women in the same age range.

If I’m Pregnant and have COVID-19, does this Raise the Risk Of Miscarriage Or Other Pregnancy Complications?

According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), there does not seem to be a higher risk of miscarriages or other complications for pregnant women who contract COVID-19. The American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists states that pregnant women may be at a higher risk for complications like premature birth. However, the data is based on studies of other similar coronaviruses, such as MERS and SARS. As of now, there is no certainty that infection is the real cause of premature birth. 

If I Become Infected with the New Coronavirus, What’s the Risk of Transmitting the Virus to My Fetus or Newborn?

A study of 9 Coronavirus Disease(COVID-19) infected women who were carrying pregnancy indicated that none of their newborns got the deadly virus. Also, it did not detect any viral particles in amniotic fluid, cord blood, or the mother’s breast milk. There seems to be a very low risk of transmitting the infection to the fetus. Moreover, there’s no scientific evidence to prove that babies were malformed because their mothers had contracted the coronavirus disease.

I Have COVID-19, can I Breastfeed My Baby?

At the moment, there is no available data about the virus being present in breast milk. However, considering that the virus spreads through respiratory droplets, we advise those mothers who are breastfeeding, must wash their hands regularly. Also, try to put on face masks to mitigate their babies’ exposure to the virus.

Should I postpone my baby shower because of COVID-19?

A baby shower is an excellent way to celebrate the coming bundle of joy. However, experts recommend social distancing to reduce the spread of the new coronavirus. The risk of exposure and infection is extremely high, especially in big gatherings. We suggest you avoid social gatherings at this uncertain time.

What should I do if 1) I have just returned from a Country in which the Virus is Widespread, 2) Have A Fever Or Cough Or 3) have been in Touch With Someone Who Has Positive COVID-19?

Each hospital has its own rules when it comes to handling situations like these. The first thing you need to do is call your physician to let him/her know the symptoms. Also, let your physician know that you have been in contact with an infected person. Don’t just show up at your doctor’s office. This is important in order to prevent the virus from spreading. Especially if you are showing symptoms, it is better to call your doctor to know if you need to be tested or visit for proper evaluation.

I’m worried that Doctors will be Diverted in an Emergency Situation and may Not be around when I am Giving Birth. Is that going to be the Case?

Presently, there’s no plan to pull doctors from their regular duties to staff other departments of the clinic. Obstetrics is a crucial component of health. Thus, an OBGYN will most likely be available when it’s time to give birth to your baby. If you still have questions, don’t hesitate to ask your healthcare provider about this.

If you have any questions regarding Surrogacy or becoming pregnant amidst the Coronavirus/COVID-19 outbreak, Physician’s Surrogacy is here to support you. Please feel free to reach out to us at (858) 299-4580. Visit our website and fill out the application to become a Surrogate completely online. You may schedule a virtual consultation to discuss becoming a parent. Please check Harvard Health Publishing’s Coronavirus Resource Center for additional information about the novel coronavirus and COVID-19.

Fill Out An Application

Interested in becoming a Surrogate? Check If You Qualify

Begin your Journey with
Physician’s Surrogacy